Frequently Asked Questions

What do the different levels mean?

The Hawaii Quality Assurance System establishes interpreting and transliterating standards at various skill levels. 

Hawaii State Sign Language Interpreter Credential Tier V

A Tier V Interpreter-transliterator can function expressively and receptively in virtually all situations.  While no restrictions are indicated, all interpreters must demonstrate professional judgment in accepting assignments.

 A Hawaii State Sign Language Interpreter Credential Tier V is issued to an individual who passes the Hawaii Quality Assurance System test at a Level V.


Hawaii State Sign Language Interpreter Credential Tier IV

A Tier IV Interpreter-transliterator can function expressively and receptively in most complex and technical situations.  This interpreter may accept assignments for one-on-one and group sessions, as well as workshops and platform assignments.  This interpreter is qualified for most medical and dental appointments, and limited legal interpreting, including client/lawyer meetings, and traffic or small claims court. 

 All interpreters must demonstrate professional judgment in accepting assignments.

 A Hawaii State Sign Language Interpreter Credential Tier IV is issued to an individual who passes the Hawaii Quality Assurance System test at a Level IV.


Hawaii State Sign Language Interpreter Credential Tier III

A Tier III Interpreter-transliterator is a qualified interpreter at the entry level.  This interpreter may accept assignments for many group sessions and workshops and most one-on-one situations.

 All interpreters must demonstrate professional judgment in accepting assignments.

 A Hawaii State Sign Language Interpreter Credential Tier III is issued to an individual who passes the Hawaii Quality Assurance System test at a Level III.


How is the HQAS test evaluated?

The Hawaii Quality Assurance System consists of  a two-part interpreting/transliterating performance test and a written ethics test. Materials, processes and training protocols were drawn from the Kansas Quality Assurance Screening, which has been shown to be a valid and reliable testing instrument. The HQAS is administered using local evaluators to ensure that test results accurately reflect the candidates’ ability to interpret within our local community.

How long is the HQAS credential good for?

Upon completing the Hawaii Quality Assurance System, applicants who have achieved Tier III to Tier V will received a HSSLIC which is valid for two (2) years. Interpreters who wish to maintain their HQAS credential must enroll in the HQAS Continuing Education Program. The HQAS Continuing Education Program provides interpreters the opportunity to develop and increase knowledge and competency in the interpreting field while maintaining their credential.

My Email Account has been stolen or hacked!

If you are an HQAS applicant or Continuing Education Program applicant, notify our administrator immediately. Provide as much information as possible, when you believe your account was stolen, what did you notice that alerted you that your account had been stolen, and what is the best alternate way to contact you. Please be prepared to provide as much information as possible including information from your original application, DCAB paperwork, and any information that will help us verify your identity.

Why did the URL change? I thought this was www.hqas.org?

When you visit our site at http://www.hqas.org that domain is pointed to our address which is hosted by Google Sites at http://sites.google.com/site/hqashawaii. This is called mapping to a custom URL. Sometimes you may be redirected to the host URL. This is perfectly normal and will not affect the security or usability of the site either way.

I am having problems with your site, can you help me?

We are sorry to hear you are having problems accessing our website. If you are having trouble viewing or submitting a form, but the rest of the site seems to display properly, your web browser may not support or you may have disabled Java Script. Please check your browser settings, advanced settings, or security settings to see if Java Script has been disabled. You may also try using a different web browser application, or a different computer. If your problem persists, please contact the HQAS administrator.